3rd Call for Short Term Scientific Missions (STSM)

3rd Call for Short Term Scientific Missions (STSM)

Call for applications is open between
December 5th till December 16th, 2016

All STSM activities must occur in their entirety
until April 1st, 2017

COST strives to support European scientists in their networking activities by Short-Term Scientific Missions (STSMs) that will allow scientists to learn from an institution in another COST country. STSMs involve visiting a partner institution for a period of up to 3 months to improve closer cooperation and exchange, to develop capacity building and joint research, publications, and preparation of future projects. The following detailed information is withdrawn from COST H2020 VADEMECUM (pages 28-29).

Who can apply?

  • STSM applicants are PhD or post-doctoral researchers, or employed by or officially affiliated to an institution or legal entity (public or private, as Home Institution);
  • COST Action IS1311 INTERFASOL subscrives COST strategy towards increased support of Early Career Investigators (ECI) (COST 295/09). Therefore, the participation of ECIs in STSM is particularly encouraged. An applicant can be considered as being an ESR when the time that has elapsed between the award date of the applicant’s PhD and the date of the applicant’s first involvement in the COST Action IS1311 INTERFASOL does not exceed 8 years. PhD students are also eligible to partake in STSMs.
  • The table below (see category A) details the possible STSM scenarios available to the respective Researcher. The Host institution (category B) concerns the institution/organisation that will host the successful applicant.

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Special Issue on “Aging and Migration in Europe” just appeared in GeroPsych

Press Release

Special Issue on “Aging and Migration in Europe” just appeared in GeroPsych – The Journal of Gerontopsychology and Geriatric Psychiatry

Europe is experiencing demographic and social challenges unprecedented in its history. Migration flows, though not a new phenomenon, represent one of these challenges. Migration as the movement of social and national groups within as well as into Europe includes several motivations and objectives. Depending on these motivations, migrants are considered as welcome asset or as not-wanted claiming benefits of the national social security systems.

What can we learn from earlier migration waves? Currently, a large number of first-generation immigrants of the big immigration waves of the 1960s and 1970s are approaching retirement age in many European countries. Contrary to earlier expectations, studies have shown that only a part of these aging migrants return to their countries of origin after retirement, whereas a larger part decides to stay permanently in the receiving country or to commute between both countries. Growing old in the context of migration has thus become a hot topic for many societies.

Continue reading Special Issue on “Aging and Migration in Europe” just appeared in GeroPsych

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